Helping Teens Concentrate

Klamath blue-green algae and specifically, a concentrated extract from the algae rich in phenylethylamine (PEA) helps young minds focus.

Until recently, Klamath algae’s ability to improve stress and nervous conditions was attributed to its general nutritional properties, however it has been shown that it is the the phenylethylamine (PEA) molecule within the algae that we can thank for the positive outcomes seen in trials.

This specific molecule helps increase the activation and transmission of dopamine, an important molecule in the central nervous system enabling information flow between cells. Vital for the control and coordination of movement, dopamine keeps us alert, active and motivated. It is necessary for “executive” functions such as constructive thinking, concentration and memory formation.

So, when we feel that dopamine levels may be low, supplementing with Klamath, the richest natural source of the PEA molecule is a good idea. Indeed, various studies show that PEA supplementation improves conditions where dopamine levels are known to be low. For example giving 10-60mg of PEA alone was able to cure 60% of clinically diagnosed depressions (1). (It is in fact dopamine rather than serotonin that is implicated in depression and low mood.)

Research has also shown that Klamath algae, and especially a specific PEA-rich extract, contain enough PEA to promote better mood, relieve stress and anxiety, help with moderate to serious depressions, as well as problems with concentration(2). In fact, PEA has been named the “molecule of love” due to its increased production in states of intense concentration, joyful activities and of course falling in love (3).

We recommend taking VitalMAX daily to boost dopamine levels thereby helping teens and others of course who are struggling with concentration problems.

References

  1. Sabelli H., et al., J Neuropsyc Clinical Neuroscience 1996, 8, 2, 168-71.
  2. Baker et al., Biol Psychiatry 1991, 29, 1, 15-22.
  3. Sabelli H.C., Mosnaim A.D., Am J of Psychiatry 1974,131, 6, 695-99.

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